Bitcoin and Mnemonics: The Art of the Secret Phrase ...

PREMISE: C_S_T has been compromised within the last year via an actual thought experiment draft

An experimental 'draft' made my JamesColesPardon can be found here posted a year ago.
In this post you can find the following quote below. I've bolded the parts I feel have compromised this sub as the 'Phase II' version of this draft has obviously ended.
Here are a list of the mod+users actively participating in this 'draft' as well as users who just have their own unique flair. I've also included which other subs these mods are moderators at besides /C_S_T
Each bolded name relates to the image flair (for example RFMN = butterfly images in browser - you can find the text relationship to the images by right clicking on the flair picture and inspecting element or using a mobile APP that shows the text)
JCP - JamesColesPardon
Mods C_S_T AlternativeHistory tragedyandhope 6hats
RFMN - RMFN
Mods C_S_T AlternativeHistory jamesjoyce TruthLeaks williamblake 6hats dylanthomas neruda
Omen - omenofdread
Mods C_S_T utcognoscantveritatem NoHope 6hats TheWooprint theZeitgeist
BRAP - BrapAllGood
OneMan - onemananswerfactory
FOXY - CelineHagbard
Mods conspiracy findareddit C_S_T AlternativeHistory C_D_T 6hats TheWooprint WikiLeaksEmailBot ConsensusProject
Ambig - Ambiguously_Ironic
Mods conspiracy C_S_T AlternativeHistory LimitedHangouts 6hats
STK - strokethekitty
Mods C_S_T ForbiddenArchaeology TruthLeaks ConspiracyAMA DebateConspiracy 6hats ConspiracyDiscussion - Putin_loves_cats
You guys are by far my favorite group of people and I can’t thank you enough, but I think I figured out a way to test your mettle and see if you guys want to take it to the Next Level. So we’re going to have A Draft. The mods here (besides nucencorship – he’s a bot, silly) are going to have a Draft early next week – Aiming for Tuesday morning at 8 AM EST. We’re going to draft in reverse order of mod rank, with 5 users total to form their Team. We’ve been scouting all week to prepare. These teams will gain access to their Team CST subreddit, which will be private. If you guys want to invite other fellow /C_S_T users into your private sub, but that’s up to you. I’ll have no control over what goes on in other private Team Subs, only my own. You can invite any other user into your private Team CST subreddit except other Team members. You will be tasked to put together something for the main sub (/C_S_T) for everyone else to enjoy. We will stagger the due dates so that ideally, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday users will be able to come to the sub and check out one thing we put out on most days (among all the other [Premise] posts, [CMVs], and general discussion posts, shitposts, and TopMind troll threads, of course). If you want to be considered for a Team, feel free to reply in this thread, although the mods can invite anyone they want on the team regardless of if you reply here or not (and of course you have the right to politely refuse if you can’t spare the time). If you do not get picked – not to worry – we’ll reshuffle the teams every once in awhile if this idea takes off (and there’s obviously nothing stopping you from making your own team as well with other undrafted free agents - hint hint). At the conclusion of the week, we’ll hold a Vote Thread where the community will vote to state which team Won that week – and put out the most interesting content or the most helpful. Voting will close at the end of the weekend and the Winning Team will get $25 in bitcoin from me via the changtip bot to do whatever you like with, as well as some new fancy flair for the week (oh, and did I mention you get your Team Mod’s flair to rock while posting here when the draft is done? I’m awesome. The Winning Team will also get some silly Textual Flair (if you want a team motto or something similar to House Words (if you’re an ASOIAF/Game of Thrones guy/gal you know what I mean – check out /asoiaf if you’re unfamiliar with how it would look).Or just “Winner For Last Week.” Whatever you want. So this is Phase II. The Draft. And the Order is as follows: Start: Tuesday, 8AM EST. Draft Order: Ambiguously_Ironic RFMN strokethekitty jamescolespardon Each Mod will make one pick in the order above, on the hour, starting at 8AM (so RFMN ‘s first round pick will be at 9, strokethekitty picks at 10, and I pick at 11). It will be a snake draft, so my Second Round pick will be at 12 noon, and then we’ll cycle back and forth until we all have 5 members that have accepted their positions. Note – I don’t want anyone playing favorites here either – say you get drafted by Ambig and really wanted STK to draft you – if you politely refuse you forfeit your draft eligibility for the remainder of the draft. And full disclosure and a tip to the other mods – I plan on drafting a few users who I actually disagree with on a variety of issues, but that’s because I’m a weirdo and want to see what that kind of team could put together. So if you get drafted – you’re either in or you’re out. Each next pick will commence after the previous mod’s pick accepts. You will gain access to your private C_S_T sub Tuesday evening, and you guys can collaborate and decide what you want to put out there (and who you want to let in – remember – it’s your sub and the only people who can’t go in are other participants in Phase II. And this obviously doesn’t stop other Team Members by trying to get in and peek at other Team’s Subs via a sock – but that’s on you because they will be invite only. I won’t be doing it and I hope nobody does – but that’s the reality of the internet and this social platform). Oh, and the last unofficial Rule (the Golden Rule is more than enough IMO) for the Team Posts especially (and the Mod who submits it will just sticky it and cycle them out daily, but that’s besides the point), everyone needs to start upvoting. I upvote every thread (that isn’t an obvious false premise that we’ve discussed previously) and every comment. The highest rated comments in these threads is in the teens to 20s, tops. We have almost 700 subs here and at any given time there’s 10-20 users here (which is pretty good IMO), and the reality of how reddit is structured, is that in order to have other people to start seeing the things we’re putting together the upvotes gotta start propelling our stuff into the /all que. If you see something great here utilize the way this place works, ie /bestof, /casualIAmA, fuck even Tweeting out links to things and trying to get some crossover works too). I don’t think I’m breaking any reddit rules by calling for a brigade because I’m just telling you all to upvote with no particular stance – I just want you to all to upvote almost everyone. There’s a lot of lurkers here and trust me, we were all lurkers here at some point in time, but it’s time to start voting and start commenting/getting involved. Keep in mind these Teams will be focusing on a particular thread or story that week (be it propaganda watch, analyzing media, analyzing legislation, whatever you guys think is important and deserves more attention than the MSM and reddit in particular seems to be ignoring, whatever), so it’s going to be up to the rest of you to start posting and challenging your worldviews. Adopt a [Premise] that you actually disagree with and try and prove it true in rebuttals. Get weird. We need more weird. But we also need more upvotes – so starting TODAY let’s see some votes for posts (especially) to start increasing so we can start gaining some more momentum. I think we’ve plateaued (although we’ve been steadily climbing since starting no less than 2 months ago – which is fuckin’ impressive to me), and we need to take advantage of what we’ve got to start getting some eyes on the stuff here, because it’s great. Keep plugging the sub in The Pit (/conspiracy) and anywhere else you see something broken down here and incorrect information being propagated in the defaults. Feel free to link to the sub, the comment, or even copypasta it and credit the user who initially posted it – at least for my stuff – but be mindful of the .np links to avoid the brigade/ban/shadowban mentality that seems to be going through this site (and will never get to this sub, rest assured). So that’s it. The Draft. Phase II. What do you all think?
So here we have a vision by JamesColesPardon basically creating a team of users (per C_S_T mod) to create content (with their own private subs to discuss their plans) for /C_S_T.
Please correct me if I'm wrong here.
Now, the part here in my thesis (yes, I have a thesis stated above RFMN) about /C_S_T being compromised can directly related to the sub-par content that we have all been experiencing in this sub in the past 4 months as well as the blatant censorship and threads being deleted.
If we reference the flair idea in the above link/quote you will see users here that are part of the 'draft' actively posting here.
This creates a conflict of interest as you have 'club members' directing and guiding the content of what is posted here.
In the beginning /C_S_T was about being open to intriguing ways of thinking - now that has been taken away by censorship.
Users with the flair are denying being part of this 'draft', but just doing a little research shows otherwise.
If the mods want to address this issue instead of deleting this thread it would prove that there is still some sort of transparency here. Otherwise, like other users have posted here I'm sorry to say but C_S_T is no longer about Critical Shower Thoughts - it is now Censored Shower Thoughts.
Please prove me wrong.
submitted by compromisedthirdeye to C_S_T [link] [comments]

Some believe that blockchains today are comparable to the Internet of the 1990s. I think we are actually much closer to the 70s and 80s in terms of utilization and adoption. But just as we find ourselves in a swelling informational singularity - soon we will be contributors to a financial one.

This is both good and bad. It's torturous because while I know that some of us can see the eventual global dominance that blockchain tech will hold over the financial system, we groan when we think of the mountain of hard work (and time) that lie between us and that destination.
The good news is that because it is still early we have a chance to truly aid this technology in its infancy, and play a significant role in an arena that will be eventually remembered as one of the significant turning points in human history.
For your consideration:
"Colossal Cave Adventure, created in 1975 by Will Crowther on a DEC PDP-10 computer, was the first widely used adventure game. The game was significantly expanded in 1976 by Don Woods. Also called Adventure, it contained many D&D features and references, including a computer controlled dungeon master.[15][16]
Numerous graphical MUDs were created on the PLATO system at the University of Illinois and other American universities that used PLATO, beginning in 1975. Among them were "pedit5," "oubliette," "moria," "avathar," "krozair," "dungeon," "dnd," "crypt," and "drygulch." By 1978-79, PLATO MUDs were heavily in use on various PLATO systems, and exhibited a marked increase in sophistication in terms of 3D graphics, storytelling, user involvement, team play, and depth of objects and monsters in the dungeons. PLATO MUDs are often ignored by historians and by the creators of other MUDs whose work came later."
(https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/MUD)
Why does that matter? MUDs represented one of the first 'fun' ways of using this new internet technology in an intuitive way that made sense to most normie nerds of the day. It was hard at the time to truly grasp the power of a decentralized informational network ('don't we already have TV?') but the application of being able to contribute to a shared fantasy environment, even if you had to use your imagination heavily, was easy to understand. People of the day would have been forgiven for imagining that this was the ultimate application of this odd new network, but in truth this was but a small representation of the eventual global dominance of this emerging technology.
The metaphor is applicable today. We are finally seeing the first true uses of blockchains for gaming, via the Counterparty (XCP) network on top of Bitcoin. Now to be honest, XCP is raw and rough, but it does what it set out to do - make abstract crypto-token implementation accessible to everyone and allow easy integration of these concepts in third party projects. Some of these are the grassroots Pepecash and Rare Pepe project (http://rarepepe.party) and the more professional Bitcrystals and Spells of Genesis tokens (http://bitcrystals.com). Both of these are significant because they are the first MUD equivalents for blockchains. I realize here in the Monero community we have CryptoKingdom which was notable for being one of the first projects to actually incorporate XMR in a game environment, but because the servers and assets are still centralized it doesn't count as true blockchain integration yet. I do have faith though that a.) there will eventually exist a secondary asset layer to Monero and b.) CryptoKingdom and others will likely establish some sort of game presence in this future layer.
So in many respects we are much closer to 1975 in blockchain history than 1995.
"But what about Monero?" you may ask. Does that not prove we are on the cusp of a next generation network standard that will go mainstream? Well, this is a tricky question. While it's true that https standards didn't come about until 1994 (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTTPS) we also have to recognize that much of the cryptography that enabled encrypted connections was in development during the early advent of the internet, not to mention was highly classified (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Encryption).
So we have to stir together many factors to make a quality estimate on where we are in the history of blockchains, but I personally propose we are solidly in the equivalent of the early 80s. It is also important to note that due to the exponential nature of technological progress, the history of blockchains will move more rapidly than the history of the Internet did, just as it progressed more rapidly than the rise of radio waves before it.
As well we should recognize that just as the Internet incorporated many new ideas in math and computer science as it grew (such as encryption) so too will blockchains eventually incorporate emerging ideas in fields such as AI and virtual reality. If Monero is our first quality "encrypted connection" standard, we should expect many more innovations along this road in coming years. I don't believe it will take decades.
To the contrary, I think that by the early 2020s we will be firmly approaching the dot-com boom period of the late 90s when the public's imagination became mass captivated by this new networking technology, and they imagined a flood of ways to capitalize on it. Of course it was too much and too soon, just as it will also be for us in a few years. As well, just as some hardcore wizards couldn't imagine advances like data-sharing via torrents a few years prior to their rise, we also should expect a few new twists and turns along the way.
To give you one potential example, perhaps you are fully vested in the future of AI and also enjoy blockchains, but have you envisioned an advanced network where an open-source AI judges the quality of your submissions and proposals and directs proportional resources into your address from transaction fees? Who ever said that UBI had to be socialist? Technocracy may be much closer than many realize. Or consider a virtual world where every square meter of its real estate is represented in colored blockchain tokens. We might call it the BitWorld standard.
My ultimate point is that it is still very early, and we are not adopters of this miraculous tech - we are pioneers in a brave new cypherpunk paradise. This is a journey that will take all of us further than even the most imaginative can dream, and similar to how most people find themselves shocked they can't answer the question of how this informational singularity known as the Internet came to exist, in distant decades they won't be able to say with certainty how the financial singularity they use every day came to exist either. But the answer is us, right now, doing what we are doing every day.
If you are read these words any time remotely near to when they were written, you can rest assured you are one of the most important humans that will ever live.
Or at least, you have the opportunity to be.
submitted by encryptedcharms to Monero [link] [comments]

The Pen Is Mightier Than the Sword? Bitcoin’s White Paper Proves It

There’s an old adage that “the pen is mightier than the sword.”
Growing up, it always bothered me. I knew it to be wrong… obviously a sword is mightier, and even on the metaphorical level, the world seemed changed more often through violence than literature.
My thinking is different now, for with every day that passes, Satoshi’s original writing handily demonstrates the validity of the adage. Within only several pages, Satoshi conveyed a design for what would become the foundation of the world’s future monetary and economic systems. It hasn’t fully happened yet, but we’re seeing it unfold in front of us. And I think we may take this 10-year anniversary to remember why it matters…
Humans have a depressing tendency to suffer under self-imposed delusion, and perhaps history can be viewed as the process of mankind sporadically discovering and casting off the self-deception under which it toils. Plato’s Allegory of the Cave conveyed it eloquently.
We live under many delusions, and for the last 100 years, at least, one such delusion has been that of fiat currency. Fiat currency is, without exaggeration, the most odious fraud ever perpetrated upon mankind.
Let’s consider it for a moment…
Fiat operates as follows: a group of certain people (called “central bankers”) acquire the right (and indeed the mandate) to declare what shall be valued most in society; that most liquid and tradeable good: “money.” They acquire this right through a combination of opportunism and ignorance — opportunism on the part of political and financial interests to place themselves at the helm of monetary creation, and ignorance on the part of the public, which has very little understanding of finance altogether. And tragically, in the fraud of fiat, the victim subjects ask — indeed they plead — for the machination to be placed down upon them. They do it out of fear of financial calamity.
They do it because their leaders tell them it’s good for them. They do it to feel secure, as a child wrapped in a blanket. Franklin is often cited as condemning “those who would sacrifice liberty for security,” yet having lost its revolutionary spirit, today this group seems to include nearly the entire population.
And indeed, once a large enough portion of people begin asking for the wise others to control and declare for them their system of value, it becomes institutionalized, and subsequent coercion is easily injected to enforce and maintain the system. Those who disobey the proclamation are punished — their property is stolen, their time is stolen, or in severe cases, their lives are stolen. The sword is employed, seeming in these cases so much more powerful than the pen. It is welcomed by the public, born down to implement and enforce the apparatus of fiat.
And with this combination of public support at the fore, and the coercive sword behind, all of mankind has knelt down into the stockade.
Under the fiat system, a portion of the wealth of every man, woman, and child, is taken — stolen — each year. The portion is only a few percent, not so bad as to feel imprisoning, especially as the dirty trick of inflation is to induce price levels to rise, rather than bank account balances to fall, and while the two are mathematically similar, those aware will recognize the latter, yet not one in a
hundred really sense the former.
Why does the bread increase in price each year? It is not due to 3 percent annual growth in the greed of the baker. Through the syphoning of this wealth, anointed “public servants” make decisions and allocate resources that do not belong to them, and in the best case, this leads to recklessness (perpetually-increasing government spending) and in the worst case, enables the wanton destruction and darkness of war, paid for — in part — by the trick of fiat inflation.
As Ron Paul commented on the 20th century, “It is no coincidence that the century of total war coincided with the century of central banking.” When accurately interpreted, fiat is a barbed-wire around the neck of civilization, piercing only enough for non-lethal blood letting, and constraining only enough to remind the victim not to run too fast in any other direction. That period in which the wire is severed, in which such delusion abstains — not just for one or several people, but for all of them — will be one of mankind’s brightest historical moments.
The promise of Bitcoin is but for a chance at that moment.
It is toward this end that Satoshi’s humble paper compelled so many of us. The goal, if I may presume the core of Bitcoin’s purpose, is to end the global system of fiat money within which we have trapped ourselves, to end the delusion, and it will do so by simply providing an open and unstoppable alternative to it; by illuminating a path out of the cave.
Bitcoin exists to separate the essence of value from any particular person or group of people. By so doing, the ability to control and manipulate money — that is to say, to control and manipulate the vast sum of people which endlessly chase after it — is substantially reduced. It reduces the power of any such ambitious group, inevitably reducing the corruption therein.
This was begun by several pages of text a decade ago, and now unfolds with no person leading the charge, yet millions inspired toward its execution. It now happens inevitably, uncontrollably, spontaneously upon the winds of markets, growing in momentum and effect with each passing year. Despite its decentralization, Bitcoin exudes an irresistible financial gravity, pulling into it people, resources, technology and energy itself. As it grows, those at the margins fall into it — first a layer of cryptographers grappling for decades with the struggle for privacy in finance and communication, then engineers, then financiers and marketers and lawyers and writers and entrepreneurs and artists. And yes, as with all booms, it has pulled in its share of scammers and frauds and superficial preachers.
Its reach now extends even beyond humanity, for politicians themselves are increasingly pulled within its grasp… most finding a comfortable home at Ripple.
Regardless of the froth and the noise, the fundamentals of crypto are sound. The technology works: for years now Bitcoin has operated correctly, growing swiftly in the hostile wilds, spawning countless other species, both competitive and collaborative. How does one defeat a Hydra in which there are not only so many heads, but so many independent bodies?
For those of us out here in the frontier with it, I think even we do not comprehend the power and inertia that is unfolding before us. The ability to move value effortlessly across the Earth was overdue. It is a power which should’ve arrived at the dawn of telecommunication, yet was censored while mankind stumbled through its fiat feverdream.
This power of universal transaction is arguably the inevitable extension of the pen that conceived it. All that has unfolded came through the consequential physics of the publication of several pages of text. And how far has it come?
Ten years in and Bitcoin could hardly be more successful — indeed since its genesis it has clearly been the most successful form of money ever invented. It has thrown entire bodies of economic theory out of the window, the old practitioners gripping tenuously from the balcony. Bitcoin grew 10,000-fold without the anointment of any king, nor the blessing of any banker. The Nobel Prize-winning Paul Krugman still so vehemently condemns it. Perhaps that is really the source of its unending power?
Despite every professional condemnation, Bitcoin stands as proof that money can emerge through decentralized market forces, with no institutional prerequisite, no fiat diktat. It must be considered, at minimum, one of the most fascinating human phenomena ever witnessed.
And so, 10 years on, begun as nothing more than the written word, first on paper and then in code, Bitcoin stands as proof of the pen’s omnipotence, and of my early naiveté on the topic of its sharper counterpart. With luck and persistence, or perhaps inevitably, we may here seize upon this phenomenon and emerge — all of us — from one further delusion, from one of the darkest caves through which man has struggled.
Beyond the speculative fervor and the unending cynicism, through the chaos of newness and the elation of success… 10 years on and at least 10 more years to go, we must not forget why we do this.
Original story and image from: https://www.coindesk.com/the-pen-is-mightier-than-the-sword-bitcoins-white-paper-proves-it/
From: https://roguecrypto.com/2018/11/01/the-pen-is-mightier-than-the-sword-bitcoins-white-paper-proves-it/
submitted by knoll-ebitwork to u/knoll-ebitwork [link] [comments]

Why today's state-operated economy is not a "Free Market", and how cryptoanarchy enables us to do it right (xpost Meshnet/Anarchism/Hackblock/OWS)

Hai guys, I spent a few hours writing this up as a comment reply and thought I'd share.
TL;DR:
IMO the cryptoanarchist solution of creating a free market with near-perfect competition will distribute value better than our inefficient current system.
.
( . Y . )
I'm sure we agree that as of 2012 "the system" (of corporate plutocracy) doesn't work very well. It works worse for some than others (e.g. Foxconn employees.) But I think calling it a "free market" is a misnomer.
First off, I define a "market" as "a bunch of people trading goods, services, and information among themselves."
Further, I define a "free" market as one where the prices of the stuff being traded are set by market forces (like supply and demand). Additionally the costs of using the market, like cost of entry and transaction costs, are themselves determined by the market. [1] (So, basically, no external actors are interfering with the market.)
Here are a few examples of how external actors actually distort the world's markets as of 02.22.12. [2] These distortions tend to benefit someone, to the detriment of someone else.
In my hypothetical free market, govts+corps can no longer interfere effectively. Transaction costs are determined by the market. The cost of near-perfect information is determined by the market. Entry and exit costs are determined by the market. And in any market worth its salt (heh heh), these costs will be low.
.
o.õ
Cryptoanarchy means, we exploit cryptography to build such a free market.
Imagine if the world's workers all download a linux live CD that, when run, connects us into a global digital agora. Crypto-based pseudonyms let us build networks of people who can trust each others' identities online without ever meeting face to face or giving up their anonymity. Digital cash gives us financial privacy, decreases transaction costs and minimizes barriers to entry. Using a distributed internet limits the risks of centralized information control.
Instantly, there is more competition in every field as people realize they can make money without having to deal with the inefficiencies of the state-sanctioned system.
People digitally sign private contracts. Arbitration companies compete with the official legal system. Few people bother to file business registrations or taxes, because the government can only chase down and punish a small percentage of violators, and others are selling insurance covering those risks anyway. Everyone is part of System D, on a global, online scale.
Eventually some hackers reverse engineer the iPhone and release open source plans for the OurPhone Ultimate. The hackers+makers of the world smell a profit opportunity and compete to manufacture and trade the various components that make up OurPhones. Others start corps that assemble components, selling OurPhones wholesale to retail corps.
Given a free market and enough time, eventually the OurPhone will compete directly with the iPhone since Apple (and Apple's entire supply chain) will have to beat the competition in the free market. Apple, granted, will start with a lot of inertia because it's an economy of scale.
So now there's more jobs and more perfect market information. Workers can compare the wages offered by Foxconn with the wages offered by WoW powerlevelling contracts, and make rational decisions about where to work (i.e. how to best allocate their labor.) The existence of $1/hour jobs shows that 2012's state-sanctioned market is not very good at allocating labor resources on a global scale.
The big benefit of market anarchy is that everyone participating gets to keep all of the value they generate. I don't know what percentage of the 99%'s income goes to the 1% through taxes, credit card interest, and inflation but it seems like a hell of a lot.
Cheers :-PLATO
.
ಠ_ಠ
[1] Interestingly, the wikipedia article on perfect markets says:
Note that the conditions for Perfect Competition mean that a perfect market cannot be unregulated, since these preconditions for market function cannot at the same time be products of the market, yet must be provided somehow.
I think this is mistaken. Nothing stops hackers from forking someone's market and improving it to more closely approximate a perfect market. As long as traders have enough information to know what markets exist, they can choose to use the market that they like best. Yo dawg I heard you like markets...
[2] Some of these only apply to the official, state-sanctioned markets - drug dealers generally don't pay taxes on their income.
submitted by therealPlato to TrueReddit [link] [comments]

Hi /r/cascadia! My friend and I are thinking about living in Portland on Bitcoins alone. Who should we talk to?

If you can help us find a space, or Know People who might be interested in selling goods and services, please let us know!
Some background:
I'm a 22 y.o. EE who took a Bitcoin Roadtrip from Hartford to Los Angeles, spending only Bitcoins for two months. I spent the most on gas and food, usually with proxy buys.
I'm an agorist, so I think having a local non-FRN currency will lead to more efficient businesses, cheaper products, and reduced need for government.
So we'll be starting from the ground up, building the community of Cascadians who are interested in participating. We'll set up an open source framework to make it easy to trade goods and services, and use a web of trust to let you filter content according to the people you trust.
I ended up in Portland in late June after finishing up the roadtrip and I really like it here. I'm keeping an eye out for EE jobs but in the meantime, I'm unemployed. This puts me in a catch 22 because it's damn difficult to get a roof over my head without income and it's damn difficult to do anything productive without a workspace. My buddy took a bus from the Northeast and he's right here with me. We've been couchsurfing for a few weeks but our welcome is wearing thin and my car's in the shop.
So, finding some housing is our number one priority. We're looking for a headquarters where we live and work. We'll consider anything with plumbing, wiring, and cell/internet coverage. A cheap penthouse in Metro Portland would be the best location, or barring that, at least somewhere with MAX access. We'd like to find some housemates to participate in the project, so the ideal space could fit maybe 4-8 people.
I'm willing to spend dollars for utilities and rent if necessary; the housemates can pool their bitcoins and sell them at the end of the month for these bills. Of course, this does kinda feel like cheating, so we would be happier if a landlord was willing to accept BTC. They can always sell the btc for dollars immediately.
Finding food and clothing will be a second priority. Got a food truck or a shop somewhere? It'll be really easy for you to participate - I've seen some nice web apps, android apps, and exchanges that are all improving the bitcoin user experience.
We might get some IP cameras and sell access to live streams, make it a reality show type deal. We won't start living on Bitcoins alone until a) we've planned this out thoroughly enough or b) I hit my credit card limit, whichever comes first.
-plato
submitted by therealPlato to Cascadia [link] [comments]

Technology, communism and the Brown Scare

This could have been a link post rather than a text post, but "Technology, communism and the Brown Scare" is a huge wall of text, much of it irrelevant. And it just goes on and on and on. Did I mention it was huge, as in ten thousand words of huge, and meanders onto twenty different subjects, and posts one of Plato's dialogues as an interlude? So I'm reposting the parts I found most relevant, because I think it still has some useful commentary today:
The linked post is from about a year ago, before GamerGate, but in a similar case of dickwads at Gawker attacking unbelievers and labeling them horrible evil bigots. The author writes something which seems to apply quite well to GamerGate too:
What the bully needs is to provoke mild approval, from the vast majority of ordinary, decent people who don't care about politics or power and are really not involved with the game at all. It's this abuse of common decency that offends me most about the witch-hunting process. The ordinary observer does not, really, believe in witches - or disbelieve in them, either. Rhetoric about black cats, third nipples and secret meetings with Satan doesn't make much impression on her at all.
But what she knows is that Goody Hannah is a strange, mean old lady with no husband and a snippy tongue, who smells funny and sleeps way too late in the morning, and once yelled at her when she was a little girl. Left to her own devices, our decent observer would never think of reasoning from this to the proposition that Goody Hannah needs to be drowned. On the other hand, when the crowd (consisting mostly of decent observers) is about to drown Goody Hannah, she's not exactly about to speak up and stick out her neck. For a strange, mean old lady with no husband and a snippy tongue? That no one speaks up, of course, is no more and no less than the witchfinders need.
I think that's a good summary of the Gawker tactics here: paint us as basement-dwelling misogynerds. They don't need to call us Hitler, they just need to call us unsympathetic enough that they can get away with it unchallenged by the outside observers. After all, reasonable people don't have enough hours in the day to investigate every allegation of assholery in detail, and they know there are real assholes out there.
The dickwad of the day, rather than Sam Biddle, was Anil Dash, who wrote this screed:
There was also a pretty dogged pitch for his startup, which will get all kinds of warm huzzahs from the intersection of MRAs, Bitcoin fans, NSA critics and Redditors. I was pretty amazed that he went for it. He flat out said that he wants his startup to be funded and wasn't sure if it'd be possible after all of his, and I replied that it realistically wasn't going to happen without the say-so of someone like me, and I wasn't inclined to give some VC the nod on this. On reflection, I'll be explicit: If you're a venture capitalist, and you invest in Pax [Dickinson]'s startup without a profound, meaningful and years-long demonstration of responsibility from Pax beforehand, you're complicit in extending the tech industry's awful track record of exclusion, and it's unacceptable.
Change a few words like "startup" and "tech industry" and it's practically current.
Moldbug refers to the SJW movement and its panic as the "Brown Scare" because of the analogy to the Red Scare, with a little search-and-replace for the acceptable targets of the day:
There was also a pretty dogged pitch for his film, which will get all kinds of warm huzzahs from the intersection of atheists, pacifists, communists and Jews. I was pretty amazed that he went for it. He flat out said that he wants his film to be funded and wasn't sure if it'd be possible after all of his, and I replied that it realistically wasn't going to happen without the say-so of someone like me, and I wasn't inclined to give some producer the nod on this. On reflection, I'll be explicit: If you're a producer, and you invest in Dalton Trumbo's film without a profound, meaningful and years-long demonstration of responsibility from Dalton beforehand, you're complicit in extending the film industry's awful track record of communism, and it's unacceptable.
One thing seems to have changed, and arguably for the better, in the year since then. It gives me hope for the success of GamerGate:
The logic of the witch hunter is simple. It has hardly changed since Matthew Hopkins' day. The first requirement is to invert the reality of power. Power at its most basic level is the power to harm or destroy other human beings. The obvious reality is that witch hunters gang up and destroy witches. Whereas witches are never, ever seen to gang up and destroy witch hunters.
We do not see Pax Dickinson and Paul Graham ganging up to destroy Gawker. We see them curling up into a fetal position and trying to survive. An America in which hackers could purge journalists for communist deviation, rather than journalists purging hackers for fascist deviation, would be a very different America.
This time, we're hardly curling up into a fetal position. We're fighting back. The gawker dickwad squad and their friends still own enough media to launch a coordinated "Gamers are over" offensive, but they haven't crushed or purged us yet!
Again with the similarities to GamerGate:
Furthermore, if you can present a natural force as a human force, it is possible to attribute almost infinite power to the witch conspiracy. Jews, for example, cause droughts. It's easy to see how strong the Jews are - it hasn't rained for a month! Throw the Jews down the well!
In this particular case, it's an observation only slightly more obvious than that the sky is blue - especially for those of us who are grownups not born in the 1990s, with, like, wives and daughters and stuff - that (a) geeks are born not made, and (b) a Y chromosome is a major risk factor for geekiness.
Or as the gawkerlogic runs in our case: Not enough female games programmers? Must be some kind of evil at work. Clearly the men are sexist, backwards, bigoted, hateful, boorish, neckbearded troglodytes, and the gaming community must be purged of the malevolent excluders. Whom it is proving very difficult to find, so let's spread some blame around on "gamers" as a whole.
Are Gawker and its ilk genuinely interested in bringing women into technology? Do they genuinely like either (a) (other) women, or (b) technology? Because it would sure seem, to the uneducated observer, that the actual effect of their actual actions is to scare women away from programming careers - on the grounds that, if they so much as master MySQL, they will be instantly raped by a pack of Satan-worshipping "brogrammers."
Yeah, this sounds familiar.
Do you know what women who actually want to help other women learn programming look like? They look like this.
Replace Hackbright Academy with The Fine Young Capitalists and you've got today.
And finally, good advice on dealing with internet trolls:
Can men be assholes to women? Can women be assholes to men? Well, actually, it's usually men who are assholes and women who are bitches - though not without exceptions. But broadly speaking, can everyone be assholes to everyone else? They can. They are. And if you're genuinely mentoring a younger person, with genuine empathy and a genuine interest in their genuine success, what you say in every case is: life is full of assholes. When someone is an asshole (or a bitch) to you, ignore him and have as little to do with him as possible.
submitted by LWMR to KotakuInAction [link] [comments]

Plato's Bitcoin Explanation for the Uninitiated (xposted from a comment in /r/enhancement)

Basically, Bitcoins are created out of thin air, just like dollars. The only difference is that the US govt says "we proclaim dollars to be valuable" and people believe them, while a million people say "we proclaim bitcoins to be valuable" and believe themselves. Governments used to say "We promise to give you x grams of gold for each dollar" but they don't do this anymore... you have to buy your gold on an open market.
If people decide they no longer like Bitcoins and won't use them, they'd become worthless - just like, if people decide they no longer like dollars and won't use them, they'd also become worthless.
TL;DR: Bitcoin manages to simultaneously a) be secure, b) not have any central authority, c) define a fixed money supply, d) allow financial privacy. This is unlike any other currency and this is why people like Bitcoin.
Jan 2009, Satoshi Nakamoto releases code for the Bitcoin client and mines the first ever "block," generating the first 50 bitcoins for himself. (He has never spent these, but other people have sent him some small tips.)
A "block" is part of the Bitcoin system that keeps it ticking. There are currently 164275 blocks chained together, one after the other, all the way back to that genesis block. They make a "blockchain," which I think of like an accounting ledger written in permanent ink.
Every 10 minutes or so a new block is mined [1] and a new page is written in the ledger by the miner, containing the past 10 minutes of transaction history for the Bitcoin network. The first line on the new page is special because it creates Bitcoins out of nowhere and gives them to the miner. All other transactions on the page have to have valid source and sink addresses (i.e. they have to be already-existing bitcoins moving from one address to another.) [2]
So, mining is how new Bitcoins are generated. Miners currently get a reward of 50 bitcoins per block. In about a year, the reward will be halved, and miners will receive rewards of 25 bitcoins per block. This halving continues every four years, until a total pool of 21 million bitcoins has been distributed to miners. (graph of this.) After 164,275 blocks to date, 8,213,750 bitcoins have been created, or a bit more than one-third of the Bitcoin pie.
So, what stops miners from writing fake pages in the ledger and redirecting all the transactions to their own address, or giving themselves 1000 bitcoins instead of 50? Nothing really, they can publish fake blocks if they want.
edit! Strikethrough below was misleading. Thanks Fraggle for helping fix it!
If a miner tampers with a block, all honest clients (both miners and users) will notice this when they receive the block. This happens because clients independently verify the contents of the block [3]. They will ignore tampered blockss and wait until an honest miner finds a block. He will repair the damage by posting a new honest block which follows the most recent honest block.
If lots of miners do decide to collaborate and cheat they can do some damage, but not create bitcoins as I implied below. See my comment for more.
/edit
They will refuse to chain new blocks onto the bad block; instead they'll go back to the most recent legitimate block and "split the blockchain" by creating a competing daughter block. The next time a block is mined, the miner must choose which chain to follow. Bitcoin assumes that a majority share of the miners are not collaborating to cheat. If they were, they could successfully extend a fake blockchain. Otherwise, honest miners will extend the honest blockchain. Clients treat the longest blockchain as legitimate, so they will disallow transactions that only appear in a shorter (presumed fraudulent) one.
So the upshot is that we have a decentralized, pubically auditable accounting ledger containing all the Bitcoin transactions, using cryptography to prove who is authorized to spend what bitcoins.
[1] Bitcoin 'mining' is a lottery of sorts. Many people are competing to solve a specific cryptographic puzzle. You can check out how many people are involved at bitcoin.sipa.be and you can read details here. As of 01.28.12 the network is operating at about 10,000 gigahash/second, or 10,000,000,000,000 "entries" into the lottery per second. There are 600 seconds in 10 minutes, so the current "odds" are 1/6,000,000,000,000,000 or one in six quadrillion per hash attempt. Most miners use GPU's. An average ATI 5000 series GPU can attempt 300 million hashes per second. The network self-adjusts to ensure that one block arrives every 10 minutes, regardless of how big the network is.
[2] You can take a look at a recent block as an example. Note that the first transaction has no address in the From: column. If you click one of the listed addresses in the other transactions, you can explore the history of each of the addresses. If you follow it back far enough you will always find that the bitcoins appeared as one of these special "generation" transactions (aka mining rewards.)
[3] This works because we have the entire transaction history available, and because transactions use cryptography to prove legitimacy. Your "Bitcoin Address" is the public half of a cryptographic keypair. The private half is stored in your wallet file. When Alice "sends a bitcoin", to Bob, what she is doing is taking Bob's public key and signing it with her private key, then sending that signed data to the whole network and waiting for a miner to include it in a block.
Both miners and regular clients can "verify" that a transaction is valid with some cryptography magic. Basically they can compare Alice's public key with the signed transaction. If Alice didn't actually sign it, the verification fails and the transaction is invalidated.
You can can go back and see where Alice got the bitcoins from, and check if that transaction verifies, and so on until they reach the original source of the coins (i.e. bitcoins generated from a mined block, see [2])
If everything checks out, the network agrees that Alice has given up her right to spend these Bitcoins, and now Bob has the right to spend them.
If the signature doesn't check out, honest miners won't include the transaction in a block and clients refuse to retransmit the bad transaction to others. If a dishonest miner does include it, honest miners will disavow that block and create an alternative blockchain, invalidating all the transactions that appear in that block (and any subsequent ones.)
submitted by therealPlato to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Why today's state-operated economy is not a "Free Market", and how cryptoanarchy enables us to do it right (xpost OWS/Meshnet/HackBloc)

Hai guys, I spent a few hours writing this up as a comment reply and thought I'd share.
TL;DR:
IMO the cryptoanarchist solution of creating a free market with near-perfect competition will distribute value better than our inefficient current system.
.
( . Y . )
I'm sure we agree that as of 2012 "the system" (of corporate plutocracy) doesn't work very well. It works worse for some than others (e.g. Foxconn employees.) But I think calling it a "free market" is a misnomer.
First off, I define a "market" as "a bunch of people trading goods, services, and information among themselves."
Further, I define a "free" market as one where the prices of the stuff being traded are set by market forces (like supply and demand). Additionally the costs of using the market, like cost of entry and transaction costs, are themselves determined by the market. [1] (So, basically, no external actors are interfering with the market.)
Here are a few examples of how external actors actually distort the world's markets as of 02.22.12. [2] These distortions tend to benefit someone, to the detriment of someone else.
In my hypothetical free market, govts+corps can no longer interfere effectively. Transaction costs are determined by the market. The cost of near-perfect information is determined by the market. Entry and exit costs are determined by the market. And in any market worth its salt (heh heh), these costs will be low.
.
o.õ
Cryptoanarchy means, we exploit cryptography to build such a free market.
Imagine if the world's workers all download a linux live CD that, when run, connects us into a global digital agora. Crypto-based pseudonyms let us build networks of people who can trust each others' identities online without ever meeting face to face or giving up their anonymity. Digital cash gives us financial privacy, decreases transaction costs and minimizes barriers to entry. Using a distributed internet limits the risks of centralized information control.
Instantly, there is more competition in every field as people realize they can make money without having to deal with the inefficiencies of the state-sanctioned system.
People digitally sign private contracts. Arbitration companies compete with the official legal system. Few people bother to file business registrations or taxes, because the government can only chase down and punish a small percentage of violators, and others are selling insurance covering those risks anyway. Everyone is part of System D, on a global, online scale.
Eventually some hackers reverse engineer the iPhone and release open source plans for the OurPhone Ultimate. The hackers+makers of the world smell a profit opportunity and compete to manufacture and trade the various components that make up OurPhones. Others start corps that assemble components, selling OurPhones wholesale to retail corps.
Given a free market and enough time, eventually the OurPhone will compete directly with the iPhone since Apple (and Apple's entire supply chain) will have to beat the competition in the free market. Apple, granted, will start with a lot of inertia because it's an economy of scale.
So now there's more jobs and more perfect market information. Workers can compare the wages offered by Foxconn with the wages offered by WoW powerlevelling contracts, and make rational decisions about where to work (i.e. how to best allocate their labor.) The existence of $1/hour jobs shows that 2012's state-sanctioned market is not very good at allocating labor resources on a global scale.
The big benefit of market anarchy is that everyone participating gets to keep all of the value they generate. I don't know what percentage of the 99%'s income goes to the 1% through taxes, credit card interest, and inflation but it seems like a hell of a lot.
Cheers :-PLATO
.
ಠ_ಠ
[1] Interestingly, the wikipedia article on perfect markets says:
Note that the conditions for Perfect Competition mean that a perfect market cannot be unregulated, since these preconditions for market function cannot at the same time be products of the market, yet must be provided somehow.
I think this is mistaken. Nothing stops hackers from forking someone's market and improving it to more closely approximate a perfect market. As long as traders have enough information to know what markets exist, they can choose to use the market that they like best. Yo dawg I heard you like markets...
[2] Some of these only apply to the official, state-sanctioned markets - drug dealers generally don't pay taxes on their income.
submitted by therealPlato to Anarchism [link] [comments]

Why today's state-operated economy is not a "Free Market", and how cryptoanarchy enables us to do it right (xpost Anarchism/Meshnet/OWS)

Hai guys, I spent a few hours writing this up as a comment reply and thought I'd share.
TL;DR:
IMO the cryptoanarchist solution of creating a free market with near-perfect competition will distribute value better than our inefficient current system.
.
( . Y . )
I'm sure we agree that as of 2012 "the system" (of corporate plutocracy) doesn't work very well. It works worse for some than others (e.g. Foxconn employees.) But I think calling it a "free market" is a misnomer.
First off, I define a "market" as "a bunch of people trading goods, services, and information among themselves."
Further, I define a "free" market as one where the prices of the stuff being traded are set by market forces (like supply and demand). Additionally the costs of using the market, like cost of entry and transaction costs, are themselves determined by the market. [1] (So, basically, no external actors are interfering with the market.)
Here are a few examples of how external actors actually distort the world's markets as of 02.22.12. [2] These distortions tend to benefit someone, to the detriment of someone else.
In my hypothetical free market, govts+corps can no longer interfere effectively. Transaction costs are determined by the market. The cost of near-perfect information is determined by the market. Entry and exit costs are determined by the market. And in any market worth its salt (heh heh), these costs will be low.
.
o.õ
Cryptoanarchy means, we exploit cryptography to build such a free market.
Imagine if the world's workers all download a linux live CD that, when run, connects us into a global digital agora. Crypto-based pseudonyms let us build networks of people who can trust each others' identities online without ever meeting face to face or giving up their anonymity. Digital cash gives us financial privacy, decreases transaction costs and minimizes barriers to entry. Using a distributed internet limits the risks of centralized information control.
Instantly, there is more competition in every field as people realize they can make money without having to deal with the inefficiencies of the state-sanctioned system.
People digitally sign private contracts. Arbitration companies compete with the official legal system. Few people bother to file business registrations or taxes, because the government can only chase down and punish a small percentage of violators, and others are selling insurance covering those risks anyway. Everyone is part of System D, on a global, online scale.
Eventually some hackers reverse engineer the iPhone and release open source plans for the OurPhone Ultimate. The hackers+makers of the world smell a profit opportunity and compete to manufacture and trade the various components that make up OurPhones. Others start corps that assemble components, selling OurPhones wholesale to retail corps.
Given a free market and enough time, eventually the OurPhone will compete directly with the iPhone since Apple (and Apple's entire supply chain) will have to beat the competition in the free market. Apple, granted, will start with a lot of inertia because it's an economy of scale.
So now there's more jobs and more perfect market information. Workers can compare the wages offered by Foxconn with the wages offered by WoW powerlevelling contracts, and make rational decisions about where to work (i.e. how to best allocate their labor.) The existence of $1/hour jobs shows that 2012's state-sanctioned market is not very good at allocating labor resources on a global scale.
The big benefit of market anarchy is that everyone participating gets to keep all of the value they generate. I don't know what percentage of the 99%'s income goes to the 1% through taxes, credit card interest, and inflation but it seems like a hell of a lot.
Cheers :-PLATO
.
ಠ_ಠ
[1] Interestingly, the wikipedia article on perfect markets says:
Note that the conditions for Perfect Competition mean that a perfect market cannot be unregulated, since these preconditions for market function cannot at the same time be products of the market, yet must be provided somehow.
I think this is mistaken. Nothing stops hackers from forking someone's market and improving it to more closely approximate a perfect market. As long as traders have enough information to know what markets exist, they can choose to use the market that they like best. Yo dawg I heard you like markets...
[2] Some of these only apply to the official, state-sanctioned markets - drug dealers generally don't pay taxes on their income.
submitted by therealPlato to HackBloc [link] [comments]

How Bitcoins can save us from the banks

TL;DR: money makes the world go 'round. buy bitcoins before the dollar collapses.
Global trends should be making everything cheaper, faster, and easier. But some things remain the same. Americans still aren't taught how to critically think in public schools. People across the globe are still hungry. Isn't it obvious that the people who make the rules, and the people who make the money - the people in charge - are not using this power and money for good?
The reason these problems still exist is simply that fixing them is not profitable. But "profitable" is soon going to be an outdated notion. Money won't matter, if we reach the point where the whole world has been stripped to the bare earth and a few giant corporations own everything. In that world, who'll give a shit what's profitable? Everyone's lives will be equally bad, except for those at the top.
The money system is controlled, collectively, by the bankers. (-1-, -2-) The banks create their profits by loaning money to companies and governments, creating debt. All that new debt has interest attached; the interest charges on the USA's debt, for the year 2010, were about half of the 2010 income tax revenue. (Right - half of 'our tax money' goes to the interest fees on Uncle Sam's credit card. After the other half is spent on other line items, there's still a couple trillion dollars worth of other bills. We've just been letting them pile up on the kitchen table for a couple of decades. See IOUSA, streaming on Netflix, or this data-packed site for further info on the USA's astronomical debt.)
The US is cheating right now by making more money to pay some of these debts. (The Fed is not part of the government. It's a private corporation whose shares are owned by... Surprise! More bankers - JP Morgan, Chase Manhattan, Goldman Sachs, etc. These are the owners who get half of our tax dollars each year. Remember when we had to bail these same guys out a couple years back, because they bet all the mortgages at a roulette table and lost all their money? Fun times!)
Understandably, other countries are grumbling about the US's unfair advantage. The dollar's value has just been dropping steadily since the Fed was invented 1933 - but since modern finance is based entirely on the dollar ('the world's reserve currency'), allowing the dollar to fail would be a very messy prospect. No countries have been willing to call us out on our shenanigans so far. But nothing good lasts forever; saying that the dollar can't fail is simply wishful thinking. Even the Council on Foreign Relations says that economically, we're no stronger than the rest of the G20.
Wouldn't it be nice to neatly sidestep this collapsing system? We might have a chance with "Bitcoins." Bitcoins are a cryptocurrency. They're anonymous, and transactions can't be chargedback. This means, that for the first time ever, we might be able to set up a real free market, free of meddling by banks and governments. Digital cash brings a paradigm shift - for example, since bitcoins are anonymous, the government can't look in your bank account to see how much tax money they can take. There's many interesting ramifications of this idea; for one, if you want to buy drugs anonymously with anonymous cash no one can stop you.
Bitcoins exist in a peer to peer network of clients, who run the Bitcoin software. All nodes talk to each other and follow an agreed-upon set of rules. These rules handle stuff like the exchange of bitcoins, preventing cheaters from spending coins that they don't own, and minting more money. The system seems pretty robust so far; and as more people use it, it gets stronger. There are 5.7 million bitcoins right now; worth about $0.75 each. The minting process will gradually slow down as the total supply of bitcoins approaches 21 million. I bought a couple hundred bitoins myself, because a) they're cool and b) if the system gets widely adopted, the value of each bitcoin will see some impressive gains.
See bitcoin.org for the official client, mybitcoin.com for a much easier to use web client, bitcoin.it for a wiki. Go buy some bitcoins before the dollar collapses. Follow @bitcoinnews, check out the bitcoin.org forums and trade anything over the counter in #bitcoin-otc on chat.freenode.net. There's also /bitcoin.
Technical details -
Bitcoin is based on public-key crypto. Imagine a big pool of bitcoins; and imagine that each one has a different lock on it. These locks are here to prevent coins from being spent without the matching key. Everyone can see and examine all of the coins and the locks, but the keys are secret... only the person with the key can unlock the lock and spend the coin. Bitcoins are digital cash - if you lose the key to the lock on your bitcoins, you have no way to ever get a new one to unlock the coin. It's like dropping change down a storm drain.
So, owning the key means that you effectively 'own' that coin. When a coin is 'spent,' the old lock and key are destroyed and new, different ones are created. The new owner gets the new key; now he 'owns' the coin because he's the only one who is allowed to spend it.
You spend bitcoins in "transactions." Let's say Alice owes Bob ten bitcoins for some data. Alice sends out a message to the network, saying 'I am transferring ownership rights of these coins to Bob'. From now on, Bob owns the coins. The system makes a note of this transaction, and a few minutes later, the transaction is recorded in a "block." Blocks are lists of recent transactions that prove the transfer of ownership. About 6-8 blocks are usually generated per hour, so each block generally contains about ten minutes of transaction history.
Every time a block is created, the creator is rewarded with some bitcoins. This is how bitcoins are created. There's a chain of blocks going all the way back to the first bitcoin that was created, in 2009; new bitcoins trickle in at a constant rate. (Over a period of decades this rate will slow to a trickle and stop; the total number of bitcoins that will ever exist is 21 million.)
The transaction record stored in the chain of blocks is complete. There is a hard record of every bitcoin transaction that has ever taken place. Clients can look through this history to check if a transaction is legitimate - if Alice sends Bob her bitcoins, the network as a whole will cry foul when she tries to send the same ones to Claire later. This prevents cheating, because anyone who tries to simply create new bitcoins out of thin air will be ignored, since there's no record of the coins existing.
However, note that until the Alice-Bob transaction is recorded in a block or three, ("confirmed,") it might be possible for Alice to send Claire the same bitcoins. In this case, the official ruling is, whichever transaction ends up in the next block counts as valid. (The nodes generating blocks will include the first transaction they receive, and ignore the later attempts.) Either Bob or Claire would get the bitcoins, the other would be SOL. So, to completely trust a transaction, you need to wait for the transaction to be confirmed.
Incidentally I am planning a cross country road trip next month funded entirely by bitcoins. Follow me on Twitter, it's going to be an epic adventure! I plan on making a podcast and blog about my travels (maybe a documentary too if I can get my hands on a camera.)
submitted by therealPlato to trees [link] [comments]

Hey #OccupyWallSt - #subverse is a brand for subversives like you. I'll pay you Bitcoins to advertise it on your signs.

TL;DR: Write #subverse legibly on a protest sign, take a photo of you holding the sign in NYC, post it here alongside a Bitcoin address, receive Bitcoins.

Hi guys. Back in January, someone offhandedly mentioned flight N987SA. I googled that, which led to other CIA conspiracies, which led to all kinds of redpills.
Over time, I realized that there were major problems with the status quo. But it was really hard to find knowledgable people and good information. Learning how Monsanto screws small farmers, learning from John Taylor Gatto's work about America's sabotaged state school system, learning what the fuck a lobbyist is... this took me months of unemployed googling. Most people don't have that much time to educate themselves, so they don't understand the fundamental problems #OccupyWallSt wants to solve.
I was confused that all of this information was so spread out. Why wasn't there a Digg, Slashdot, or Reddit for all of this subversive stuff?
I'd like to set up a site to sort and index and filter all this content, but I'm spending too much time being unemployed and homeless to code that yet. [1] What I did do was define a brand that represents our drive to fix the world: Subverse.
The revolution isn't televised. It's entirely up to us to teach everyone else what's going on and how to change it. "Subverse" is an awesome name with ideal connotations - there is a whole world of underground intel that's dangerous to the Powers That Be if it becomes public knowledge.
So, I have a few Bitcoins left over from my #BitcoinRoadtrip. I really believe that this context is the final thing we need for the 99% to unify, so I'm offering to pay bitcoins for your help. Think of it yourself as a street team advertising the global revolution. Bounties will be proportional to the awesomeness of your sign. Here's a couple logos I came up with.
btw, I'm in Portland OR but I've been following #OccupyWallSt with rapt attention. I'm maintaining a Twitter list of users who are on the ground. Please tell me of new accounts to add!
[1] Everyone on Reddit gets an equal vote, including shill accounts and other Meanies. The key is to track reputation of each user and weed out these disreputable. Imagine Ebay feedback that works on multiple sites: when you sell a guitar, or buy bitcoins on an exchange, or use a rideshare network, all these interactions affect your reputation. Now imagine a wiki full of subversive stuff where you can opt to only view edits by users you trust.
submitted by therealPlato to occupywallstreet [link] [comments]

DTDFeV - YouTube This equation will change how you see the world (the ... Der Neue Wiesentbote - YouTube Peace and Bitcoin Remastered - YouTube

From Bitcoin Wiki. Jump to: navigation, search. A coast-to-coast journey where no dollars are being spent, only bitcoins. The trip was made by Bitcoin community member Plato between April 2011 and June 2011. The plans for the trip were communicated on March 21, 2011 which described the motivation and the method for traveling from Hartford to L.A. spending no dollars for expenses or other ... Bitcoin donations: 1F1dPZxdxVVigpGdsafnZ3cFBdMGDADFDe Bitcoin and a great number of other cryptocurrencies are electronic versions of currency. Many people falsely assume that crypto proponents are for a cashless society and this is certainly not the ... The trip was made by Bitcoin community member Plato between April 2011 and June 2011. The plans for the trip were communicated on March 21, 2011 which described the motivation and the method for traveling from Hartford to L.A. spending no dollars for expenses or other purchases. The trip is being blogged and tweeted. Tweets use the hashtag #BItcoinRoadTrip. While on the leg of the trip through ... Now live, Satoshi Pulse. A comprehensive, real-time listing of the cryptocurrency market. View prices, charts, transaction volumes, and more for the top 500 cryptocurrencies trading today.

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DTDFeV - YouTube

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